Injectors

If you want diesel fuel injectors to be tested, repaired, or to have new ones supplied, you are at the right place. Here is a summary of various types of injectors, the injectors Raglan Diesel Injection service, repair and supply.


Single Spring Hole-type Injector

Mechanical Injectors

Using the pressure the pump develops to actuate the needle in the nozzle, they are relatively simple in construction and operation.  The pump determines both the timing and quantity of fuel that is delivered to the engine.  They come in a few different guises, and although there are others, the two mentioned below are the main ones.

Pintle-Type Nozzle Injectors

Used in indirect injection designs, these are an older style that have been fitted to engines for decades.  If you have a diesel car or light-commercial vehicle that does not have a common-rail system, then this is the type of injector that will be fitted.  Simple and cost-effective to rebuild.  They were in the likes of Toyota Hilux, Ford Courier and Mazda Bounty.

Hole-Type Nozzle Injectors

Standard equipment in direct-injection engines, and somewhat noisier in operation than indirect injection engines.  For that reason, these were more commonly fitted to the larger engines in trucks, buses and construction equipment where the extra noise was not quite as objectionable.  Most of these units have a single spring, but some utilise two springs, providing two stages of operational pressure.

Older Nissan, Hino, Mitsubishi, Fords, and others, including farm machinery, had injectors in this style.

Raglan Diesel Injection is equipped to care for the majority of pintle and hole-type injectors in the market.


Common-Rail Injectors

Common-rail systems are indeed now common. From the late 90’s onwards, these systems have been the standard fare for road-going cars and light commercial vehicles, and their use extends into larger equipment, such as trucks and off-road machinery.

Manufacturers such as Bosch, Delphi, Siemens and Denso produce common-rail injectors for a wide variety of applications. Have a Ford Ranger, Toyota Hilux or similar from the mid 2000’s onwards? Or a Cummins QSB in your machine? These are your style of injectors.

With emission legislation continuing to tighten, the pressures within the system continue to rise, and the control over the injection phase has become more and more finely tuned with improved technology. However, these factors also mean common-rail injectors are more susceptible to contaminated fuel, containing either water or particles.

Common rail injectors are now the majority, and Raglan Diesel injection has the equipment to test many of the injectors in the marketplace. We rebuild common-rail injectors and have some remanufactured injectors available. New injectors available also.


Unit Injectors

These injectors have one thing in common despite the different ways their function is achieved.  They consist of a single unit that contains both the pump and injector.  Some are driven by a cam, others are actuated hydraulically.

Mechanical Unit Injector

Older CAT and Cummins equipment had this style of injector.

Mechanical Unit Injector (with an external electronic control)

Known mainly as ISX (Interact System) or HPI (High Pressure Injection) injectors, Cummins, Scania and Komatsu use these in several applications, in on-road and off-road use.

Electronic Unit Injector

These have an actuator combined with the injector assembly, and this controls the delivery of fuel, both for quantity and timing. Some have the actuator combined within the main body to form an inline unit, and others have the actuator to one side of the main body of the injector.  Scania, CAT, Iveco, Detroit, Cummins, Volvo and others utilise this style in their equipment.  Mainly used in heavy-duty applications, they were utilised in smaller units also. Volkswagen has them in vehicles like the Golf and Touareg.

Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injector

These units have a hydraulic arrangement that amplifies the injection pressures rather than a cam providing the pressure like the previous examples.  One advantage the HEUI system has is that it does provide increased injection pressure at lower engine revs.  Predominately found in CAT heavy-duty engines (e.g. C9, 3408/12), road-going examples are out there, including some of the Ford F-Series trucks.

Raglan Diesel Injection has invested in EUI and HEUI test equipment and are able to test, rebuild and supply many of the injector options.  We also have remanufactured injectors available on the shelf.